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The acquisition of small arms skills for both individuals and groups is an issue of paramount importance to armed forces, who seek to instil these skills in new recruits as well as maintain them in experienced troops. The SITTAL Small Arms Technical Training Simulator from RUAG Defence is designed to do just that.

Using highly realistic 3D worlds offering a wide variety of environments from desert or Arctic to urban, SITTAL can be set up for squads/groups of around 5-10 soldiers and is available in either static (fixed) or mobile variants. It places trainees in realistic situations, enabling the shooters to experiment with and rehearse differing methods of achieving better results. Taking full account of the shooter’s weapon characteristics (weapons can be tethered or untethered at the user’s discretion), SITTAL gives trainees every opportunity to master complex situations, including limited fire and movement activities.

A typical SITTAL installation comprises 5/10 firing lanes, each of which can accommodate a single shooter with a weapon ranging from 5.56mm to 20mm calibre, including pistols, assault rifles, riot guns, machine guns, auto-cannon and even light anti-armour weapons such as the Saab AT4CS. The system’s flexibility means that user specific ancillary equipment can easily be catered for – as in its use with the French army, for example, where the FELIN optronics goggles are used in routine firing drills. Simple range firing can be easily replicated (i.e. firing in a controlled environment at static targets) but the greatest benefits begin to be felt when using the system’s capability to provide reactive targets, where target behaviour is controlled by an artificial intelligence engine.

An instructor station equipped with multiple monitors and a printer allows for almost instant after action review, whether aimed at specific individuals within a group or the group in its entirety. The instructor is also able to vary the pace and content of the training programme, introducing new scenarios ‘on the fly’ to reinforce specific techniques or correct errors. The system can produce infinitely detailed statistical analysis of the combined effect of such issues as aim, cant, breathing and trigger pressure, for example.

Described by the company as “evolutionary and open,” SITTAL is already in extensive use with the French Armed Forces, where the army operates 43 10-lane systems, the air force six 5-lane variants and naval special forces a single 10-lane version.



For more information please see MILITARY TECHNOLOGY #12/2016, available at the show on booth #2729; and frequently check back for more NEWS FROM THE FLOOR.

 

RUAG’s SITTAL Small Arms Technical Training Simulator seen here at the company’s Impulstag 2016. (Photo: Mönch/DPM)

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